Tag Archives: culture

Mind the Gap

I watched a BBC documentary on The Taj Mahal Palace, one of the best hotels in the world located in Mumbai according to the documentary. It certainly looked the part. The opulence and the service was certainly worth the thousands a stay would set you back by. This struck me but what struck me more was the homeless families who made their home outside the walls of the hotel. The poor women who sold recycled flowers to make enough to feed their children. Where were the men who fathered those children I wondered? If the Taj was so successful, couldn’t it be charitable enough to feed its resident poor? How could the guests stand to walk (or more likely drive) in past those poor wretches into such luxury?

This sort of wealth inequity is replicated all over the world of course. The less industrialised the nation, the more likely you are to see scenes like these replicated. In Yola where I come from, this is very much in evidence. It is not unusual to see a huge mansion complete with high surrounding walls, an impressive iron gate manned by gatemen and perfectly manicured hedges sitting next to a hut, little more than a lean-to with dry barren land surrounding it and the inhabitant(s) unable to afford 3 square meals and clean drinking water.

When I was little, we would have bouts of feeling charitable and go visit one of those poor homes. Most of them are inhabited by single old women. Some were called witches because of their social isolation or maybe because of their disdain for some of our archaic cultural norms. Many are just poor and alone, without a benefactor to lift them out of abject poverty. A good proportion were quite old and really did need a hand. My friend and I would go in and give their hut a spring clean, refill their water pots (their lounde) and clear out accumulated rubbish. We would leave with their prayers for us and our mothers ringing in our ears. These women managed because they had neighbours like us who would go in periodically and help out.

That is one thing I love about Yola. By Yola I mean Yola town. Not the metropolis that is Jimeta which has lost most of its old school community (or maybe being ‘new’ never got a chance to form the same bonds). No one can deny that poverty is pervasive in the society there but actually, so is charity. It is imbedded in our culture to look after our neighbours. No one in Yola that I know of has ever died of starvation (malnourishment is a different kettle of fish). If your neighbour struggles to find a meal, they could simply turn up at meal times and they would get fed.

I remember one of our dear matriarchs who had little herself always fed more than just herself and her dependents. We always had food to eat at hers even though she was poor herself. When we went to see her before we went off to boarding school, she would ask for forgiveness (in case she died before we came back) and forgive us any infractions then she would rummage under her mat and give us some of her precious savings so we could buy something. We would demure unfailingly but we also knew we had to take it. Because not to take it would be seen as disrespectful and a sign we did not value her loving gesture.

This was 2 decades ago. Things are changing but charity is still very much alive. I am not sure whether the local children are still doing what we did back then but I sincerely hope so. Especially because as religion and politics become more and more of an issue and many of those in our communities claim to be religious. Well then. If that is true, true poverty should never be an issue. Islamically, Zakat is part of our core duties, one of the 5 pillars of Islam.

“Be steadfast in prayer and regular in charity: And whatever good ye send forth for your souls before you, ye shall find it with Allah”                                        Qur’an Chapter 2 Verse 110

For any Muslim who can afford to support their living themselves and have something left over, they should donate 2.5% of their wealth to those who are in need. This is Zakat. Imagine if in a society like Nigeria where an estimated 50% of the population (87 million) are Muslims. Now imagine that about half of them can afford to pay Zakat. If even half of those (20 million) contributed 2.5% of their wealth to a community fund that was well-managed, things would be so different. So I challenge the practising Muslims who preach all things good to sit up and remember this core duty of ours. More than a billion Muslims across the globe, a good proportion with enough wealth to alleviate poverty all around them. Let’s do it people!

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Straight Up Nigerian

Nigeria is a humongous country so I will not even attempt to write about it all in one little blog. It would take a whole book to make a dint in the story that is Nigeria. This blog will focus on my memories of growing up in Yola.

Yola City. 2 words. Enough said but just in case you have not sampled the delights of my hometown, I shall expand on the 2 words. Why do I love Yola so? Biggest reason is because my mother is the happiest there and whatever makes my mama happy, I love. Yola like me is full of contradictions. It is still small enough in Yola town (different from Jimeta a.k.a Yola North) that most residents either know me or my mama and will definitely know who my granddad is. So I cannot go round being naughty willy-nilly because they will come round to my house and make me feel like I am 3 years old again.

Knowing so many people is a great advantage. When I visit Yola, I get lots of food brought round and somehow these people know all my favourite foods, all the food I spend many hours daydreaming about back in Birmingham. Every morning is like a lottery and throughout the day, I intermittently check on the little dining table by the fridge to see if there have been any food deliveries. This time, I got at different times: Dan-wake, waina, masa, sinasir, dakuwa, kosai, gari basise, okro soup, this tapioca-type grain which I had with yoghurt, zogale (a.k.a moringa) seeds which were awful, a traditional kanuri drink made up of milk with bits of chewy yumminess in it, dambun nama, zobo and more. I was in food heaven. I ate small portions often in an attempt to get through a bit of everything. I didn’t remember half of those who sent the goodies to thank them but you know what? They probably got report that I stuffed my face with all of it and are satisfied they have done their bit to feed me.

Yola’s geography is awesome. We are in the North-east corner of Nigeria. In the old days, we were definitely in the savannah but now with all the aggressive deforestation by unethical businesses, we are part desert and part savannah. When you drive to Adamawa from Jos/Bauchi sides, you can see the more abundant greenery and exotic plants give way to Neem and baobab trees and green green grass in the rainy season dotted with low shrubs and anthills. I think Adamawa has cleaner crisper air and I can almost taste Yola when I drive into the Adamawa region. The river Benue goes through the state and is an amazing sight to behold in the rainy season. In the dry season, the water level is so low that the river Benue is reduced to a network of streams. In these months, you can see families fetching water, doing their laundry and bathing in those streams. I always want to stop the car and go down into the river bank, feel the sand underneath my bare toes like those families. In the rainy season, it is very different. The banks of the river are full to bursting. In fact more and more these days, we get floods as the effect of global warming is felt. Around Numan if you look carefully enough down at the river from the bridge, you’ll see how there is a clean side of the water and the dirtier muddier side of the water and curiously, the 2 seem separate as the river gushes past. I cannot remember the explanation my mama gave me when I asked decades ago but it doesn’t even matter to me. All I know is that the clean water somehow knows not to mix with the dirty water despite there being no physical barrier separating the 2. Incredible.

I love Yola market especially on ‘market’ day which has always been on a Friday. Back in the day, my mama banned us from going to the market unless in the company of adults. Most of the time, we obeyed that rule but not on Fridays. Every Friday, we would find a way to sneak out of the house with all the pocket money we had managed to save and head to the market. The biggest draw was the snake charmers who would display their trained cobras and even pick on members of the public in the audience to help them out with their tricks. My mama hates snakes so although I was less afraid of them, there was still a healthy dose of fear that I inherited from her. I used to have to look away from time to time during those displays as the excitement crossed the border into fear. However, I never turned down a chance to go there as long as my sister and I were in town on the Friday.

The other act we loved was the monkey owners. These people were less reliable and would turn up randomly. They even went house to house to perform and get given change. I loved the monkeys best and would pray for them to turn up every day during the school holidays. Sadly, my house was never visited. I am not sure whether it is because of our scary dogs or maybe my mum or stepdad were not receptive. Anyway, I was resourceful enough to catch them at the market or neighbours’ house. Another reason for my love of Yola market is the contraband fast food on sale. Contraband in my house meant any cooked food from a kitchen whose owner we didn’t know personally. Naturally I loved everything not cooked ‘at home’ so I was a regular customer and my favourite buys were Dan-wake and allele (bean cakes) cooked in tins with a drop of palm oil to make it glorious. Mmmm, these 2 foods are still my absolute favourite snacks from home.

Other delights I will never forget in Yola market include Amani who had a bad scarring infection on his face once upon a time and his vegetable stall. I loved the exotic fruit sellers sitting in the fruit section who came with their fruits picked fresh from the villages in our state. I loved the goruba sellers right at the back of the market especially because they had sacks of the thing and I always wondered if they ever sold it all and what sort of tree the gorubas came from. I loved the ‘odds’ lane where everything from nails to tree gum for charcoal ink and batteries were sold. I also loved the sweets man near the Fulani ladies with their fresh milk and yoghurt. I was a regular at his stall and especially loved it when he went to Cameroun and came back with the little pink mint balls with green stripes called bon-bon. On the rare occasion we needed to buy yoghurt, I would speak to the Fulani ladies and be amazed they spoke my language because these were the nomadic Fulanis (the bororos) and they were so pretty and different from us. I would watch in fascination as they tipped a ceramic dish of yoghurt into the one I bought without disturbing the smooth set of the yoghurt. I was so happy then. Le sigh.

I will finish on one final point about Yola. I loved the neighbourly spirit in the community when I was little. I rarely ate a proper meal at home in those days. I was always round one neighbour’s house or the other eating their meals because it was different from the meals at home. You know as a child, the grass is greener on every other side. There was always food in these homes and I was always welcome to it. I ate to my fill and said thank you then off I went. Mango and guava trees were abundant in those days (and I guess still are) and when those fruits were in season, I would forget about meals and just gorge myself on those fruits, sitting high up in the trees. So much so that I was constipated half the time because in my impatience, I would eat the fruits half raw particularly the guavas. I, of course, kept my medical problems to myself because I knew fully well it was self-induced and that actually my mama was clear on the rule that we should not be eating unripe fruit. One year, we discovered the delight of climbing up date trees and we were round Amadi’s home daily, eating so many dates that I still cannot handle more than 1 date at a time these days. I had a whale of a time growing up in Yola despite all the naughtiness. I have no regrets fortunately.

Scapegoating: the current vogue

My father-in-law is Zulu or as they are called when they are Zimbabwean settlers Ndebele. He was telling me the other day about Mugabe’s Korea-trained soldiers (the Sixth Brigade) and how a few years ago, hundreds of young Zulu men were rounded up and shot by them. There was a lot of unhappiness amongst the Zulu and when Mugabe was back for ‘re-election’ campaigning, he was asked directly and he prevaricated but no apology was made. The Zulus are sitting there with resentment and as the years tick by with no justice, the anger and resentment builds.

Now imagine that Mugabe was a Muslim and the Zulus were Christian immigrants. If Mugabe had killed so many hundreds of Christians, he would have been branded an ‘islamist terrorist’. What that term means I have no idea. Except it has the word Islam in it to further demonise all of millions of Muslims all round the world who are no more terrorist than you and I. All those Muslims who are living peacefully with their non-Muslim neighbours.

I, as a Muslim, have non-Muslim family and friends who I love as much as I love my Muslim blood relatives. My in-laws are all Christian and I love them regardless. Even if every time I go to their homes they pray for me ‘in the name of Jesus’ which to me is like a big ***k y** and your beliefs. Some of those Christian friends and now family despite knowing me and claiming to love me still think that all of us Muslims are murderers and would murder them in their sleep given the chance. That I would take up the arms I do not believe in and kill them just because they are not Muslim. Fills my heart with disappointment but what can one do?

My sister’s current BBM status says ‘expect nothing and you won’t be disappointed’. So now I expect no less from the non-Muslims I meet who ask me if they came to Nigeria, would they be killed? Does anyone out there know anything of history and demographics anymore? Last time I checked, Nigeria was not a Muslim country and has never been. The places where I have invited people to (Abuja, Kaduna and Adamawa) probably have at least 50% Muslims and Christians, never mind that in Yola town, the majority may be Muslim and even that I am not wholly convinced. Never mind that all those things that are seen as Islamic are actually part of the Fabric of Yola – where every indigenous girl regardless of faith is expected to wear a scarf once she has reached puberty and not sleep around with every Tom, Dick or Harry who cares to ask. Where if your neighbour has a car and your mother falls ill in the middle of the night, you are welcome to knock on your neighbour’s door and ask them for a ride to the hospital. Where if your child is hungry, you can knock on a neighbour’s door and they would share of their lunch or dinner. Where my marriage has been celebrated in every home I know despite the fact that my husband is from a non-Fulani non-Muslim background. Where everyone is saying they will start saving now so that they can come all the way to England to meet my husband because he hasn’t yet made the trip to Yola. Where every time I am greeted, they pray for me and my husband, bless my marriage and pray for us to have plenty of healthy children. These are the people that are terrorists. These are the people who want all non-Muslims dead.

My people who are not allowed to complain about the atrocities that plagues them all because they happen to be Muslim. When the girls in Chibouk were abducted, people said they are all Christian (which is not true). My mother and her people (civil groups and human rights activists), many of them Muslim like my mother organised rallies and demonstrations in Yola and Abuja to get the world’s attention on the issue and demand for those girls to be brought back. One of my so-called friends on Facebook then posted on her wall that we Nigerians were making too much noise. Why are we going on about these girls? Like so many ignorant people have asked and I said to her as I say to every other ignoramus who thinks they should ask us to be silent: ‘why shouldn’t we?’ If my mama and her people did not shout so loudly, they would have been accused of complicity as with Boko Haram even though they have been shouting about Boko Haram for years. If these nearly 300 girls abducted had been white British or American children, no one would have dared to complain about people wanting them back. This same ‘Facebook friend’ of mine who is the mother to 2 children would make more noise had her 2 girls been abducted too. But no, it is okay for her and so many others to tell us not to make so much noise.

To anyone who thinks that, I say I do not need friends like you. I do not even want friends like you. So unfriend me on Facebook, take me off your BBM, delete my phone numbers from your phones and leave me alone. Go and spread all you negativity and hatred somewhere else. Go and pick on someone else who needs or wants you. Me, I will be just fine with the friends and family who love and understand that I am just like you. I do not want to kill anyone. I do not want them to kill me. I want to have children and I want them to be free to worship or not as they please. Without being victimised for it. After all, it is one of the basic human rights. Freedom to worship!